(Source: moodyviolence)

blvck-biatchh:

Arabic coffee

blvck-biatchh:

Arabic coffee

(Source: billieviper)

(Source: vanessayves)

haifaal-otaibi:

..يا ليت من نتـمنى عند خلوتنا .. إذا خلا خلـوةً يومـاً تمـنانا

haifaal-otaibi:

..يا ليت من نتـمنى عند خلوتنا .. إذا خلا خلـوةً يومـاً تمـنانا

(Source: eunoiaofillusions)

lapitiedangereuse:

“the good parts of a book may be only something a writer is lucky enough to overhear or it may be the wreck of his whole damn life — and one is as good as the other.” Hemingway

lapitiedangereuse:

“the good parts of a book may be only something a writer is lucky enough to overhear or it may be the wreck of his whole damn life — and one is as good as the other.” Hemingway

(Source: musclemenobsession)

hoyaholic-hopanda:

i salute you for all the women out there.

(Source: spekyulate)

(Source: cumberbatcha)

The depth of isolation in the ghetto is also evident in black speech patterns, which have evolved steadily away from Standard American English. Because of their intense social isolation, many ghetto residents have come to speak a language that is increasingly remote from that spoken by American whites. Black street speech, or more formally, Black English Vernacular, has its roots in the West Indian creole and Scots-Irish dialects of the eighteenth century. As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own.